Discussion on “India and France – A connect through Art Diplomacy”

India Foundation’s Center for Soft Power hosted a discussion on the topic of “India and France – A connect through art diplomacy” in collaboration with Alliance Française of Madras. The event looked at the connection that India and France have through their rich artistic traditions, and how the confluence of these traditions can further strengthen the bonds between the two countries.

The discussion featured a number of speakers covering numerous fields including:

  1. H.E. Ms. Catherine Surad, Consul General of France in Pondicherry and Chennai
  2. Mr. Jonathan McClory, General Manager, Asia, Portland Communications and Author, Soft Power 30 Report
  3. Padma Shri. Smt. Chitra Viswesaran, World renowned Bharatanatyam artiste and Padma Shri awardee, who has received honorary citizenship to the city of Bourges in France, for her performances
  4. Mr. Bruno Plasse, Director of Alliance Française of Madras
  5. Mr. Romain Timmers, Founder of Compagnie Distil, a modern circus and vertical dance company.
The Panel constituted speakers from numerous fields of Art and Diplomacy

The Discussion began with a video address from Jonathan McClory, wherein he spoke about the status of Indian and French Soft Power globally today. He noted France’s position as being 2nd in the latest Soft Power 30 report, and pointed to its engagement with the rest of the International community as one of the reasons for ranking so highly. When speaking on Indian Soft Power, he noted that while India didn’t make it into the top 30 countries, it still excelled in specific fields such as Digital and Cuisine.

“France and India are not the most obvious of partners, and that makes any collaboration between the two countries hugely powerful” – Mr. Jonathan McClory

H.E. Ms. Catherine Surad, spoke to the audience about cultural diplomacy from the French perspective. She spoke about the various elements of France’s cultural diplomacy strategy, and broke down how and why they undertook such a strategy. She also noted that this strategy is not one that is superficial but that has had a deep and natural impact in numerous countries across the world.

“The question of Soft Power is, in our view, the question of the cultural diplomacy that we have been practicing since very long ago.” – H.E. Ms. Catherine Surad

Padma Shri Awardee, Chitra Visweswaran spoke about her experience travelling across France and bringing her performances to some of the lesser known cities and venues in the country. She spoke about the deep affinity she has for France and how she was able to experience the French way of life, while also imparting some elements of Indian art and the Indian way of life to the people of France.

“It would not be wrong to say that Bharath is my favourite country. But of the remaining, my favourite is France” – Padma Shri. Smt. Chitra Visweswaran

Mr. Bruno Plasse, spoke about the role that Alliance Française plays in ensuring that Indian and French cultural exchanges take place, not just on paper, but at the ground level. He spoke about the efforts to bring authentic French artists to India and of the deep interest that Indian people have shown to France and French culture.

“Though English is widely spread in India.. The love for the French language is still there in India and in Chennai” – Mr. Bruno Plasse

Mr. Romain Timmers, spoke about his journey to India. He noticed that the sound made by the balls in his circus perfectly mirrored the sounds made by the Tabala and Ghatam, and this is what attracted him to India. He started coming to India frequently and now even resides here. He spoke about the differences between his modern circus and traditional circus.

“The sound coming from a left tabla and a Ghatam is similar to that coming from a bouncing ball, which brought me to India” – Mr. Romain Timmers

Interview with Rakesh Raghunathan

Shri.Rakesh Raghunathan is a full time food traveller & show host, Dakshin Diaries. He has travelled to Singapore, Malaysia, Dubai, and London to showcase the link between history, mythology, food and music. His travel enables him to discover that every place has people who are custodians of great recipes! “We have to document our grandmother’s recipes because we have always taken them for granted. We can never recreate their intricate recipes but can atleast try to bring their flavor of taste!”.

As a distinguished panelist for AHARA, Center for Soft Power had an interesting  interview with him.

1. WHAT DO YOU LOVE TO COOK ?

Whenever I am in town I love cooking a full course traditional South Indian food that can be served on a banana leaf! I grind and mix aromatic spices on Ammikal ( a roller stone) and not in an electric food blender.

2. YOU HAVE BEEN MAKING EFFORTS IN BREAKING THE STEREOTYPE THINKING THAT SOUTH INDIAN FOOD MEANS IDLI, VADAI, DOSAI, SAMBHAR, &FILTER COFFEE. WHEN DID THIS IDEA COME TO YOU?

Yes , South Indian food definitely is categorized thus, if you ask a person who knows a little more,he will also include Chettinad food. Actually there is so much more! When I  document food for my shows I realize that in Tamil Nadu itself every district has its own unique indigenous food ingredient because of the seasonal produce that are grown. These are incorporated in their cooking.For example, if you go to the place Virudunagar you will find lot of peanuts, which  you will not find anywhere else. When you move toward the hilly areas like the Nilgiris you will see usage  of millets.

Not only with respect to food, but also with respect to Temple prasadams (offerings), handicrafts, culture,there are amazing diversities. Our grandmothers had even special vessels (lead pots ) to make Rasam, I doubt whether people know how to use those  special vessels now. I am afraid they would melt away the vessel!

Across India when people conceived the menu in the good old times, there was a science behind it . For example if  there was Vathakuzhambu ( made out of tamarind extract) there was Parupusli ( soaked , ground and steamed pulses added to vegetables) to supplement the protein.

A Milagukuzhambu ( made out of pepper and herbs)  had Parupu thogaiyal (like  humus chutney) to go with it !

3. AHARA IS ABOUT HEALTH AND WELLNESS THROUGH FOOD. DO YOU THINK EVENTS SUCH AS THESE CAN CREATE AWARENESS AND LEAD TO BETTER FOOD AND LIFESTYLE CHOICES?

Absolutely! If you look at the trends today, restaurants are opening up with traditional and seasonal recipes. The younger generation wants to go back to the roots and enjoy food in the  most conventional way. AHARA in one such event which will bring awareness to the people about the benefits of food and its many facets.

“Across India when people conceived the menu in the good old times, there was a science behind it . For example if  there was Vattriyakozhambu ( made out of tamarind extract) there was Parupusli ( soaked , ground and steamed pulses added to vegetables) to supplement the protein.”

4. HOW DO YOU PERSONALLY MONITOR YOUR OWN DIET AND EXERCISE REGIMEN IN THE MIDST OF YOUR HECTIC TRAVEL SCHEDULE?

To be honest, it is tough. Every time I go out to document and research on food, there is a lot of physical work involved like walking, climbing mountains, talking to tribals,that takes care of a part of my exercise. Having said that, when I get time, I do Surya Namaskar and other work outs. Sometimes I loose a few kilos, sometimes gain a few especially when people offer me tasty sweets out of affection.Lot of travel and long strenuous shoots helps me maintain a balance.

5. INDIA HAS THE LARGEST OF VEGETERIANS IN THE WORLD. HOW DOES A SHOW LIKE PULIOGARE TRAVELS HELP A DESIRE TO GO VEGETARIAN. HAVE PEOPLE SPOKEN TO YOU ABOUT IT?

Puliogare travels basically started of as a blog, more to document food, nostalgia, memories, recipes, culinary traditions, practices etc. It is a venture which traces and explores traditional Indian foods made in kitchens and temples across South India.Except for one or two posts that had references to meat it is largely vegetarian. I have nothing against meat, I like a holistic portrayal of food. It’s more about my personal choice that Puliogare Travels has been vegetarian and people have been inspired by this for sure!

6. WHEN PEOPLE TALK ABOUT INDIAN CUISINE IT IS USUALLY ABOUT SOME STANDARD DISHES. WHY IS THERE NOT A GREATER DIFFERENTIATION OF THE LARGE DIVERSITY THAT INDIA HAS TO OFFER?

We are getting there.Even when you go to a restaurant abroad, they typecast South Indian food as Idli,Vadai,Dosai, and North Indian food as  Saag paneer, Butter Chicken,Dhal fry etc. Now there are chefs who are pushing boundaries, working with farmers on the seasonal produce to recreate dishes that meant so much to them in their childhood. Every chef has experienced good food when growing up either from their parents, grandparents, aunt, uncles or any close relatives. This would have influenced their taste and aspired them to recreate the nostalgia through the dish they make. Indian food is being presented today to a more aware and learned audience abroad, and we are expanding our cuisine to showcase more varieties beyond Saag paneer, Idli and Dosai.

7. IN A MODERN CONTEXT, WHERE INDIAN DIETICIANS THEMSELVES ARE PROMOTING OLIVE OIL AND OTHER WESTERN INGREDIENTS HOW DOES ONE GO BACK TO LOCAL PRODUCE AND FOODS?

Well,the direction is slowly shifting. We are going back to using coconut oil, groundnut oil, sesame oil, and ghee, for genuine, lingering taste! In my workshops, sometimes people ask me whether they can cook and sauté in olive oil. I question them “ Did your grandmother use olive oil for traditional recipes, then why would you want to introduce something new into your body which it is not used to ?”. There are enough health benefits in these oils.Its unfortunate that we require endorsement for coconut oil from abroad, to believe its advantages !

It was actually such an integral part of our ancestors lifestyle.

If its a Italian or French food, salad dressing, then olive oil is definitely suitable.

8.COULD YOU TELL US MORE ABOUT THE VARIOUS SHOWS THAT YOU DO ABROAD AND THE RESPONSE  RECEIVED?

I have travelled to Malaysia,Dubai, London, Singapore for my shows which are generally based on certain themes.Using caricatures,music, photography, we draw parallels and perspectives on food, the history and culture. My presentations on “Sacred offerings” has become extremely popular where I try to appeal to all the five senses through music, food, and mythological stories. So the audience can hear, see, smell, taste and touch!

“Now there are chefs who are pushing boundaries, working with farmers on the seasonal produce to recreate dishes that meant so much to them in their childhood.”

9. IT WAS BIG NEWS WHEN UBIQUITOUS UPMA WON THE FIRST PRIZE IN A NEW YORK COMPETITION. WHAT ARE THE POPULAR DISHES WITH FOREIGNERS?

Great to know that the Mumbai-born Floyd Cardoz had whipped up an Upma and won $100, 000 in the Top Chef Contest in LA, 2011. Aarthi Sampath also won the popular American reality show,Chopped, by making the most innovative bread Upma you’ve ever heard of in 2017. Its so remarkable that such a humble breakfast staple of South India has made international culinary headlines!

Popular dishes among foreigners are :-

IDIAPAMS

DOSAIS /STUFFED CREPES

SAMBHAR

CHAT
MANGO KHULFI

MANGO CHUTNEY/LASSI
SAMOSAS

PANNEER

10. CAN YOU NAME TOP FIVE NUTRITIOUS FOOD FROM SOUTH INDIAN CUISINE THAT EVERYONE MUST KNOW ABOUT.

South Indian diet is very healthy indeed . I would choose the following :-

  1. ADAI
  2. PESARATTU
  3. KANCHIPURAM IDLI
  4. KUZH in any form
  5. PIDI KOZHAKKATTAI MADE WITH MILLETS

11. FINALLY , HOW CAN YOU DESCRIBE DAKSHIN DAIRIES AS A SOFT POWER ?

Food is an icebreaker. It connects people and communities.When people cook and eat together  irrespective of languages, customs, culture and places, it brings them closer and melts boundaries. Its a unique team building exercise too.

Isn’t is rightly said that ‘The way to a person’s heart is through the stomach!”

TCS World 10 K marathon a great draw for foreign athletes

‘The streets, the people, the city, and the culture here in Bengaluru reminded me of my hometown Barcelona’ –Former Women’s World No 1 tennis Champion Arantxa Sanchez Vicario

The TCS World 10K Bengaluru is one of the richest marathons in the world running circuit and draws many top athletes from all over the world to Bengaluru every May. The marathon has a total prize fund of $213,000, with the men’s and women’s winners each taking home $26,000.

This year, an estimated 25,000 runners took to the roads for five different races in what has become one of the highlights of Bengaluru’s sporting calendar. In addition to the TCS World 10K for elite runners, there is an Open 10K, the Majja Run (5km) the Senior Citizens’ Race and Champions with Disability Race (both 4 km).

This year Andamlak Belihu of Ethiopia won the TCS World 10K Bengaluru 2019 marathon title. In the women’s category, Kenya’s Agnes Tirop again won the title, becoming the first woman to win back-to-back titles in the 12-year history of the Bengaluru race.


Arantxa is the International Event Ambassador of TCS World 10K Marathon

In the quest to keep raising the profile of the event, Procam International, promoters of the IAAF Gold Label Tata Consultancy Services World 10K Bengaluru, the world’s premier 10K run, chose former women’s World No. 1 tennis player Arantxa Sanchez Vicario as the International Event Ambassador.

The Spanish legend who won 14 Grand Slam titles, including four in singles, is the most decorated Spanish Olympian having won four medals.

Arantxa Sanchez spoke to the Center for Soft Power during her visit to Bengaluru for the race. 

What role has running played in your training as a top tennis player?

Running has played an important part in my career and I think it is the easiest way to keep your mind and body sound. Sport has the ability to connect communities beyond the competitive spirit, and instil a sense of pride amongst all and celebrate accomplishments. Running has managed to do just that. It was exciting that my association to this sport in India began with the TCS World 10K in Bengaluru. I was overwhelmed to be there on the start line with all the runners and enjoy the infectious energy on race day.

How does Bangalore strike you as a ‘running’ capital?

Running is a sport that has no barriers and TCS World 10K is a great example of it. Not only it promotes healthy lifestyle and physical well-being but it also promotes togetherness and the feeling of giving back to the community. The city of Bengaluru has taken to running like second skin, and the participation numbers are a testament to that. 

How does India rate in such premier races?

The fact that this IAAF Gold Label event in India resonates with a Spanish athlete like me and convinces me to become the International Event Ambassador says a lot about how sport brings the world together. The event also had elite runners from around the world coming in to compete. For the fact that year on year, Procam International does everything right that they earned the Gold Label and interest in participation from athletes around the world. 

She said that the streets, the people, the city & the culture of Bengaluru reminded her of her hometown Barcelona

What are impressions about India?

India never ceases to surprise me. But I have to admit that this trip for the TCS World 10K Bengaluru was the best I have been on so far. The streets, the people, the city, and the culture here in Bengaluru reminded me of my hometown Barcelona. And then the Race Day on Sunday morning was so overwhelming. Over 25000 runners gathered inside one venue, warming up together and then hitting the road at the break of the dawn was a sight to see.

Brett Lee Bats for Music Therapy

Former Australian fast bowler Bret Lee is known to cricket lovers as one of the best pace bowlers in the last century, consistently bowling over 155 km/hr. After his retirement from cricket, he has launched Mewsic, which offers music therapy, to underprivileged children and those suffering from cancer.  In an email interview, he speaks about music and children.

Mewsic was kick started by former Australian fast bowler Brett Lee in India in 2011. The Mewsic Therapy Programme was launched along with St Jude’s India Childcare Centres in 2013 in an aim to use music therapy as a complimentary therapy to support children, and their families, who are struggling with cancer.

What does music mean to you both personally and in terms of its power to enhance the lives of children?

My family and I grew up on music so it’s a very important part of who I am. It’s been a part of my life since I was a little kid and definitely something that brought my family together. For children, music can provide an opportunity to express themselves while still teaching important lessons like the importance of practice.

Please could you tell us about your music interests and skills?

A lot of people say this but I really do love all types of music. Personally I play the guitar and piano. I’ve been part of a band, which is a lot of fun because it brings in the element of being in a team, like cricket.

Do you believe music can help children with disabilities and is this opinion based on research or is it your own experience with music?

I’m a firm believer that music can definitely help children with disabilities and other conditions, and there is a great deal of research out there that validates this belief. Our program with St Judes helps children who have been diagnosed with cancer manage anxiety, express themselves emotionally and has even been shown to reduce pain and there are many studies which show the medical benefits of using clinical music therapy on cancer patients.

How much time and mind space do you devote on your music therapy project?

I try to devote as much time as possible. Whenever I am in India I make sure to catch up with the amazing team that helps me put the program into action as well as the beautiful children who are part of the programs. To be able to see the difference that music has made in their lives is inspiring.  And in Australia I often speak at events to raise funds to support and create awareness about our work in India.

How did your love for music translate into compassion Indian children?

I knew from my visits to India throughout my cricket career that it was a country that shared a lot of my passions. The love of cricket obviously, but also a great musical culture. I decided that I wanted to try and use my profile as a cricketer and love of music together to try and help children.

What kind of resources does one need for a project like this? How did you manage to garner funds and resources?

I guess that the main resources that we need on an ongoing basis are donations to keep our programs running.  We need people to ‘sponsor’ the music tuition of our Mewsic Stars, and to help us fund our Music Therapy Program at St Judes.

But we are also looking for other help – donation of musical instruments so that we can give the joy of music to more children, and also opportunities for our Mewsic Stars to perform.  We have formed a band with our students in Dharavi who have become very good and love to get on stage to a live audience and showcase their talents.

We would also appeal to the music and Bollywood industries to provide opportunities for our kids to have musical ‘experiences’ ie see a live studio recording, be in the audience of a music TV Show, have a one off Masterclass session with a famous musician.

What is more satisfying bowling a juicy yorker and getting Sachin bowled or cheering children up with one of your songs?

That’s a very tough question! I think I would really want both because I couldn’t pick between them.

Is it possible to have two personas – one aggressive on the field and the other empathetic and compassionate off it? Were you a different person on and off the field?

Yes I think that’s true to some extent. On the field you need to be a total competitor and, especially as a fast bowler, being aggressive is often part of that. But there is no reason to carry that on after the match. A lot of the batsmen that I had my toughest battles with on the field were good friends of mine once the match was over.

Mewsic helps kids with cancer

Mewsic was kick started by former Australian fast bowler Brett Lee in India in 2011. The Mewsic Therapy Programme was launched along with St Jude’s India Childcare Centres in 2013 in an aim to use music therapy as a complimentary therapy to support children, and their families, who are struggling with cancer.

Executive Director and Founder – Innovaid Advisory Services and Chairperson – Udayan, Kolkata, Emily R Menon speaks about the potential, hurdles and great dedication that music therapy entails. She helps run the Mewsic programme in Mumbai.

What is the scope of your work? When was it started, how many centres are there now, how many musicians involved, how many children and families impacted?

Mewsic was kick-started in India by Brett Lee in 2011 and our initial focus was to establish Music Centres in slum communities so that children could have the opportunity to learn music – singing, dancing, keyboard, guitar and a variety of other instruments.  It was a very successful program – helping keep children out of mischief, exposing them to positive mentors and introducing them to their first experience of learning music!

We launched our Mewsic Therapy program with St Jude’s India Childcare Centres in 2013 when we trialed the program by placing an Australian Clinical Music Therapist at their Parel Centre for two months to provide music therapy to the 30 children and their families living there.  The program was an instant success and the impact on the children was immediate.  Staff noticed marked changes in the behavior of children – less angst and anger, improved compassion and interpersonal skills as they lived so closely together and better management of emotions. 

Thanks to the support of Rotary, we were able to place a fulltime Clinical Music Therapist at the centre for 12months and began to monitor the impact of the sessions on the children. 

There is a dearth of Clinical Music Therapists around the world, and indeed, here in India, so it has been difficult to get properly trained, accredited professionals to continue our work.  We have continued to use music as a form of therapy by providing weekly music workshops and activities with the 35 children at St Jude’s Parel Centre and it has become an integral part of the weekly life of the centre – particularly as children undertake their music therapy, away from school, friends and their homes.  It is easy for them to get bored and feel frustrated.

St Jude’s has three centres in Mumbai (Parel, Kharghar and Cotton Green) and to date we have only been able to supply music therapy to children at the Parel Centre.

Sound Space currently provides weekly music as therapy sessions to children in Parel and Kharghar, and we have just launched Clinical Music Therapy to our children in Cotton Green.

We were fortunate to find an experienced and skilled Indian Clinical Music Therapist, Astha Luthra, who we recently employed to work full time at the new St Jude’s Cotton Green Centre which will be home to 150 children and their parents.  Astha provides both group and individual sessions to children on a weekly basis who staff identify as dealing with particular pain or emotional challenges.  She also dedicates some time to promote Music Therapy as a clinical form of complimentary therapy – talking to doctors, the medical fraternity, students and the media to educate them on the benefits of Music Therapy and how it actually works.

What is your mission? Is there hope and evidence for clinical improvement or does it focus on quality of life parameters?

Our mission is to use music therapy as a complimentary therapy to support children, and their families, who are struggling with cancer.

A growing number of studies suggest that music can aid healing in many ways.  One recent scientific paper from Harvard University showed how music therapy helped stroke patients regain their speech, and other studies have found that music may improve heart and respiratory rates. It also helps to control blood pressure as well as anxiety and pain in cancer and leukaemia patients.

Additionally music therapy is very good at helping patients manage pain, which is traditionally managed through the administration of drugs. Research has shown that those who utilize Music Therapy have a decrease in the amount of drugs administered, due to higher tolerance and pain threshold ability.  Music Therapy is also found to play a key role in helping patients bodies become more receptive to treatment (ie chemotherapy) as it helps to relax patients, ease tension and fear – all of which have dramatic physiological impacts on the body prior to treatment.  Music is also key in stabilizing patients both physically and emotionally in this regard which reduces the pressure on hospital and center staff and promotes overall healing among patients.

What is the spectrum of health issues you have dealt with and with which

At Mewsic we focus primarily on children suffering from Cancer, however we have also invested, in the past, in the establishment of a Music Therapy Academy, operated by The Music Therapy Trust in Delhi, to train Indians in a Post Graduate Diploma in Clinical Music Therapy.  We believe that there is a need for more Music Therapists in India who can use this powerful form of therapy to help people suffering a range of health problems.

While no Indian musician would question the emotional impact of music on listeners, few believe in its healing powers. Does your experience prove otherwise?

Once again, Clinical Music Therapy is so much more than just ‘listening to music’.  And yes, very few people in India are aware of the healing benefits provided through Clinical Music Therapy – which is what we practice at Mewsic and St Judes.  There are many musicians who claim to do ‘music therapy’, however there is no regulatory body (as there is in other countries) in India to regulate the delivery of the therapy.

Whilst there is often an initial skepticism among some patients, parents, even doctors, once they read and learn about the research studies and the results that have been achieved around the world, they are convinced that there is something very scientific about the therapy and the results it achieves.

A growing number of studies suggest that music can aid healing in many ways.  One recent scientific paper from Harvard University showed how music therapy helped stroke patients regain their speech, and other studies have found that music may improve heart and respiratory rates. It also helps to control blood pressure as well as anxiety and pain in cancer and leukaemia patients.

In fact we have been approached by a number of hospitals both within Mumbai and outside, to provide Clinical Music Therapists to work among their patients.  However the dearth of qualified and certified music therapists in India has meant we are unable to provide this service.

A 2007 survey of U.S. health facilities by the Society for the Arts in Healthcare, along with the Joint Commission and Americans for the Arts, found that of the 1,923 facilities, 35% offered some type of music therapy to patients.  Similarly, today in Australia, almost every major children’s hospital in the country houses a Music Therapy Department which delivers a range of services to children to help them better handle treatment, pain, and the emotional trauma of hospitalization and their injury/disease.

This indicates the growing case for support for the inclusion of Music Therapy services and its positive impact on patients.

Are parents and children in India open to music therapy as a viable option of treatment or are they also skeptical?

Yes, once the benefits are explained.  Our primary target market is paediatric cancer patients and in this context, it is a very powerful modality.  Our patients are not only suffering from the disease, but they are also suffering from the emotional impact of being away from their homes (all our patients come from across India), their siblings, their schools.  Their parents are struggling with the financial impacts as they are required to be in Mumbai with their child and cannot earn a living.  So the integration of Music Therapy at our centres really helps them manage their emotions and the variety of issues they are dealing with.

Are the doctors, psychologists and social workers on board with music therapy?

There is a huge need for ‘awareness raising’ on the issue of Clinical Music Therapy and our full time music therapist, will be spending 1 day a week talking to doctors, nursing staff, medical students, NGOs and journalists about the clinical research findings and benefits of the use of Music Therapy. 

Doctors at Tata Memorial Hospital have been happy with the results of the music therapy on the St Jude’s Child Patients, however we have not had therapists work for long periods of time to create any validated research of our own.

What kind of music activity constitutes therapy? Is it individual or group? Also is there a preference for instrumental or vocal music?

  • Music therapy sessions usually last between 30 to 45 minutes
  • The sessions are conducted in groups and individually.
  • Depending on a patient‘s situation, they may have regular therapy for weeks or months
  • The music therapist will make a ‘treatment plan’ related to ‘referral aims’ or goals, for the patient
  • The Music Therapist and patient will use instruments and voice in sessions to improvise music that will support the referral aims and achievement of goals.
  • The Music therapist uses psychological and psychodynamic knowledge to explore the needs of the patient and to develop a therapeutic relationship
  • Patients do not need to be able to play an instrument to be referred to Music Therapy

Does your project involving teaching music too? If yes how is the course structured?

As outlined in the first question, yes, we have been teaching music to children in Dharavi, Govandi, Mankurd, Hyderabad, Lucknow and Jaipur.  Today we provide scholarships to talented, disadvantaged students, to study music (we support any instrument, but currently have scholarships supporting guitar and keyboard).  We hope to grow and expand this program and anyone who would like to sponsor a child for 12 months of music lessons is encouraged to reach out to us.

Australians engaged with India – Dr Valerie Wilson

“We gradually came to understand how special, how unique each of India’s textiles were” – Dr Valerie Wilson

Dr Valerie Wilson and Sue McFall co-founded MOTI in 2001, which sells limited edition clothing, nightwear and homewares made from beautiful Indian textiles in Australia. In the midst of researching and sourcing photos for her forthcoming book – A touch of India, Valerie spoke about her experiences in engaging and working with Indians.

Valerie has familial links to India. Her mother was born and raised in Mumbai, and her grandfather was half Indian and worked as an electrical engineer for the Tatas.  Valerie’s parents met in Bombay when her English father, fighting in Burma during WW2, visited India while on leave. The young couple married in 1945 and moved to Cambridge where her father’s studies had been interrupted by the World War. Valerie was born in Cambridge two years later. She visited her grandparents in Mumbai when she was was 6 years and again, for 6 months, when she was 10. They family lived in Panchgani where her grandparents lived after retirement.

Dr Valerie Wilson
Valerie’s love for India and her desire to know more about her heritage lead her to take a year of Indian Studies as part of her BA and over the years she says she has read many great Indian writers and novels mainly, but also general reading about India.  

It was during her third visit to India, much later, that Valerie was truly smitten. “There is such a lot to see and do. Just being in India, anywhere, is to immerse yourself in a wondrous new world, landscapes, religions, colours, monuments, textiles, people of all sorts!! All the obvious touristy sites are unmissable. But there is so much else besides. It’s fascinating, exasperating, exhausting, addictive!”

Valerie worked as a consultant for many years before plunging into Moti. And a lot of what she learnt in her earlier profession helped her to navigate through India. “In a general way I think that, as a qualitative researcher, I was used to asking questions and always seeking greater understanding. I was used to being self-employed, to working things out for myself. For several years I had worked in marketing research so I had a good understanding of consumer attitudes. And I had a very good partner (Sue McFall) in the enterprise who is a self-employed architect, familiar with design and production processes.”

Initially they were attracted by the cotton from Mangalgiri and even visited the town of Mangalgiri to watch the various processes in action. “We used to order multiple meterages of different colours. We loved it. We usually ordered through an intermediary in Hyderabad or Delhi. We also came to love Maheshwari, Khadi and numerous other fabrics. There are so many!”

While Valerie says they did not have a lot of direct contact with the weaver themselves, their various suppliers taught them a lot about “the differing techniques of weaving and of block-printing so that we gradually came to understand how special, how unique were each of these textiles. And how humbling. That’s what struck me the most. A garment that we might casually throw on has been through so many time-honoured processes, has taken so much time and dedication to produce.” 


She describes an incident with a bangle producer and how they became impatient with a supplier who seemed to be taking a very long time to provide some resin bangles for them. “We hadn’t realized that they were being painstakingly carved by hand and he could only do two a day. 

So we often had reality-checks of this sort and learned patience and humility!”

Having said that, there were issues with quality and consistency as is wont to happen in handmade goods. “Our business liked the fact that handmade goods are a bit inconsistent because that is what lends character, what differentiates hand-made goods from factory or machine-processed goods. Our customers were often surprised to learn that every thread of fabric in a garment we sold had been woven in by hand. We had to remind them, to educate them. Especially as we often used plain colours and a lot of plain black! (I’m afraid people in Melbourne like to wear black.) So it was even more surprising in a plain fabric to realise each thread was hand woven in. But they were also pleasantly surprised by how hard-wearing such fabrics can also be. However the idiosyncrasies of hand weaving meant that we didn’t ever consider wholesaling our garments. We needed it to be a personal business, where we could tell the stories, educate our customers. Then they could see, as we did, that the idiosyncrasies were charming! (Sometimes however, idiosyncrasies were simply faults and were less charming!)”

Once they ordered 200 metres of black silk-cotton and when it arrived in Melbourne it was grey. “Not even dark grey, but a mid-grey. When we protested we were told “it’s the Indian black”!!

Valerie says that Indians and Australians share a similar sense of humour, and often humour helps to deal with situations. “We see the funny side in things that others may perceive as problems. We enjoy good-natured banter. We can all use humour to defuse difficulties. And there are quite a lot of difficulties for foreigners trying to do business in India: we have to learn to deal with heat, dirt, noise, disease (tummy bugs), indirect conversations (e.g. people not wanting to say ‘no, we can’t do that for you’), power shortages, lengthy delays in Indian traffic, lengthy delays receiving ordered goods….and more! But it’s worth the effort: the rewards are both tangible and intangible, the pleasures, the gradual understanding, the insights, the friendships…”

And finally, one asks Valerie about Cricket. Valerie says that when people would ask them where they were from, while walking in a market, and when they replied Australia, it would inevitably lead to long conversations about cricket. “Luckily I know a bit about cricket via my three children who used to play. But sometimes we were tired and couldn’t cope with cricket-talk so when people asked where we were from we would reply ‘Yugoslavia’. Silence. (But a bit mean of us!!)”

In 2016 twin sisters, Marilyn and Christine Shady took over the running of MOTI. But Valerie says she and Sue continue the tradition of MOTI with their love of India.  

Australians engaged with India – The Evolving Art of Konnakkol


The art of Konnakkol, where percussionists vocalise rhythmic syllables, is fading in Carnatic music – even as Western musicians are taking to it with gusto for everything from learning rhythm to mastering and controlling complex rhythmic structures in playing their own instruments.

For over 20 years Australian vocalist Lisa Young has been dedicated to konnakkol artistry.  As a jazz singer who loves rhythmic expression, she has integrated konnakkol into her contemporary vocal style and compositions. A long time student of gurus Kaaraikkudi Mani (Chennai) and M. Ravichandhira (Melbourne), Lisa shares with us a unique take on what she believes to be a highly creative, and continually evolving art form..

Dr Lisa Young

Adjunct Research Associate at Monash University, Australia, a Jazz singer and a disciple of Karaikudi Mani Iyer, says Konnakkol has a broad range of practical and creative functions for musicians of any genre. “Konnakkol is maybe our default system for rhythmic comprehension and our intuitive starting point for composition and improvisation. This wonderful rhythmic language provides a systematic approach to rhythmic materials, generally absent in Western music pedagogy. It provides a conceptual framework for metred numerical calculations, improvisation, composition, rhythmic comprehension and analysis, transference of musical ideas, and expression of musical pulse,” says Young

Many of her compositions and collaborative works are performed by vocal group Coco’s Lunch, and her jazz/world music group Lisa Young Quartet.  She also has a keen interest in choral music, composing works that combine Western and Carnatic techniques, which are performed by a variety of choirs worldwide.

Lisa began studying konnakkol in Melbourne in 1994 with mridangist M. Ravichandhira and through him became a student of Guru Kaaraikkudi Mani, founder of the Sruthi Laya Kendra School in Chennai.  From 1997 to the present day she has visited India for intensive study periods with Mani, and been “inspired by this sophisticated, expressive, rhythmic vocal language and its complex systems of musical metreand subdivision.” 

In Lisa’s Own Words:

“Over many years I have integrated konnakkol language and Carnatic techniques in my creative practice, for example; laya ratna akin to metric modulation and yati a rhythmic calculation designed to represent geometric shape.  I often combine Western and Carnatic concepts, including ragaand solkattu, as the foundation for melodic composition and improvisation.  I continue tocompose original konnakkol structures and also to integrate and adapt those composed by Mani, in a variety of ensemble settings.  Over time, the solkattu language has become an integral part of my vocal performance, providing an additional rhythmic-based language that augments the melodic jazz-vocal ‘scat’ language, the wordless lingual syllables used for vocal improvising in the jazz tradition. 


Whilst musicians use konnakkol initially to learn the Carnatic rhythmic system and materials, konnakkol is itself a language.  Once a musician has grasped the fullness of this language including the groupings, the phrases, structures and techniques of numerical calculation, metric modulation, expansion and reduction, it becomes the backbone of one’s deep rhythmic knowing and conceptualising.  The artists’ thoughts are regularly occupied by solkattu phrases and structures.  Konnakkol is their default system for rhythmic comprehension and their intuitive starting point for composition and improvisation.

Do you incorporate a lot of Indian sounds in your playing and vice versa do you find Indian musicians learning from you?

It’s not just about sounds.  It is about the whole musical system.  Once you learn the Indian way of developing the rhythmic timeline then your approach to rhythm is expanded exponentially. There is so much to help expand your musical horizons.  Of course, this works both ways.  Composing and improvisation have very different approaches as you travel across the world.  Sharing in each other’s musical systems is one of the most magical things you can imagine.  There are so many treasure troves uncovered when you explore each other’s musical worlds.  Most of the Indian musicians I have worked with are as excited to explore this as me.

In Lisa’s Own Words:

“Over many years I have integrated konnakkol language and Carnatic techniques in my creative practice, for example; laya ratna akin to metric modulation and yati a rhythmic calculation designed to represent geometric shape.  I often combine Western and Carnatic concepts, including ragaand solkattu, as the foundation for melodic composition and improvisation.  I continue tocompose original konnakkol structures and also to integrate and adapt those composed by Mani, in a variety of ensemble settings.  Over time, the solkattu language has become an integral part of my vocal performance, providing an additional rhythmic-based language that augments the melodic jazz-vocal ‘scat’ language, the wordless lingual syllables used for vocal improvising in the jazz tradition. 

Whilst musicians use konnakkol initially to learn the Carnatic rhythmic system and materials, konnakkol is itself a language.  Once a musician has grasped the fullness of this language including the groupings, the phrases, structures and techniques of numerical calculation, metric modulation, expansion and reduction, it becomes the backbone of one’s deep rhythmic knowing and conceptualising.  The artists’ thoughts are regularly occupied by solkattu phrases and structures.  Konnakkol is their default system for rhythmic comprehension and their intuitive starting point for composition and improvisation.



Eternal and Internal Pulse

Alongside my passion for the expression of this sophisticated vocal percussion language, I have been particularly drawn to the Carnatic music systems of tala and nadai where a breadth of attention is given to detailed rhythmic structures and sub-divisions in a wide variety of odd and even metres or metred cycles.  This detailed systematic approach to rhythmic materials is generally absent in western music pedagogy, and thus my Carnatic studies have influenced and enriched my rhythmic knowledge and expression. In pulse-generated music (as opposed to rubato or alapana sections) there is usually an ongoing eternal pulse outlining the given metre.  This is ‘felt’ or experienced in conjunction with at least one internal pulse layer sub-dividing the beats.  In Indian terms this may be thought of as tala and nadai. The internal pulse (nadai) may be altered in certain sections within a composition, or adjusted spontaneously by the improvisor.  Additionally in the Carnatic system, subtly embedded within the internal pulse, is a third rhythmic layer dictated by sub-groupings the solkattu language itself.  The solkattu language places the beats into groups, usually in 2’s, 3’s and 4’s for example as – tha ka | tha ki da | tha ka thi mi adding an independent layer of rhythmic sub-grouping, integral to understanding the Carnatic system.  Thus a subdivision of 7 or 9 is not simply 7 individual septuplets or 9 nonuplets, as the interior language imposes a distinct rhythmic grouping system

Switching the internal pulse of a given metre is used to great effect in Carnatic music.  The technique of laya ratna, which literally means ‘time’ or ‘speed shifting’ in Tamil, is akin to metric modulation in Western music.  When switching the internal pulse of the metre, the tala (or eternal pulse) remains steady, but the nadai (internal pulse) changes speed.  Proficiency with this technique is an important part of a Carnatic musician’s craftA common laya ratna shifts from a subdivision of 4 to 6 to 8Performing these metricshifts is a fundamental element of the Carnatic tradition; it is a tool, which is used to virtuosic effect in performance.   

In most Western jazz music, the metre or eternal pulse is given as a time signature, for example 6/8 or 4/4.  The internal subdivision – if required – is either written descriptively as, for example: ‘swung quavers’ or ‘straight 16ths’, triplets etc, or described as a musical ‘feel’, such as ‘swing’ or ‘shuffle’.  Of course there are many layers of rhythmic complexity that create a sense rhythmic depth in jazz music, including concepts of metric modulation, polyrhythmic structures, rhythmic feel, and groove.  But within the Carnatic pedagogy there is a fundamental relationship between a musician’s instinctive ability to internally subdivide a given metre, and their ability to explore and interpret rhythmic complexity in performance.  

Significantly, solkattu develops a musician’s rhythmic intuition, which can be easily transferred into any musical situation, aiding comprehension and transference of pre-composed ideas and concepts, and engaging the invention of new music with improvisation and composition.

As a musician’s companion, artists (both Indian and Western) fluent in konnakkol move beyond its original pedagogical role to employ its use as a highly creative tool, in which konnakkol provides a conceptual framework for metred numerical calculations, improvisation, composition, rhythmic comprehension and analysis, transference of musical ideas, and expression of musical pulse. 

Along with timbral and pitch variations in contemporary konnakkol delivery, I explore intoned and pitched konnakkol as a fully integrated vocal and musical expression in a Western contemporary vocal or jazz context, embedding konnakkol and wordless lingual sounds within this format to create a unique ‘vocal sound-bank’ as the basis for my vocal expression.  This style of pitched konnakkol is a distinctive feature of my creative practice.  In this process, my compositions integrate konnakkol language and concepts as melodies, riffs and the language for improvised passages.  My recent works for example The Eternal Pulse, Tha Thin Tha and Other Plans, demonstrate the adaptive and evolving use of konnakkol in contemporary performance practice.  In these works I am applying the tools of both the Carnatic and jazz traditions to create a form of musical expression that is not simply an ‘Eastmeets West’graft.  Rather, these processes are a mode of creativity, which involve an understanding of both musical traditions in the development of a performance language and style.     

Conclusion:

As a vocalist embracing two musical cultures, I believe that konnakkol combines an intellectual and intuitive approach to rhythmic comprehension and acts as a faithful companion to my creative musical undertakings.  It is at the foundation of my rhythmic experience and knowledge, assisting my rhythmic analysis and comprehension in both Carnatic and cross-cultural projects.  I enjoy using timbral variations, atypical syllables, applied vocal techniques and personal interpretation in konnakkol recitation, and I hope my creative works that integrate konnakkol demonstrate the way an artists’ aesthetic preferences may influence the evolving adaptations of the konnakkol art form and language.Whilst the role of the solo konnakkol artist may be diminishing in India,certainly many musicians and institutions in the West are investigating and including a core study in konnakkol. I hope that this stunning art form will continue to thrive, evolve and be adapted by both Carnatic and Western musicians.  Again I say, may it be our default system for rhythmic comprehension and our intuitive starting point for composition and improvisation.

श्रुति स्मृति चतुर्दश अष्टादशविद्याः (śruti smṛti caturdaśa aṣṭādaśavidyāḥ)

Centuries before  the founding of the world’s oldest surviving universities – the University of al-Qarawiyyin (founded in ~859 CE) and the University of Bologna (founded in~1088 CE) – it is recorded in Chinese sources that Bhārat’s Nālandā, situated in today’s India, in its heyday had ~10,000 students and ~1,500 teachers, with students visiting from Japan, Korea, China, Central & Southeast Asia!

The lyrics of this single श्रुति स्मृति चतुर्दश अष्टादशविद्याः (śruti smṛti caturdaśa aṣṭādaśavidyāḥ) contain lines from texts Yājñavalkya Smṛti and Viṣṇu Purāṇa which are historical/textual attestations of categories of learning and subjects — parts of systems of Indic knowledge  — that were taught in universities like Nālandā. 

In short, this is hence a tribute to Indic Knowledge Systems caturdaśa aṣṭādaśavidyāḥ (https://bit.ly/2DbnjS2) — which bring together categories/texts as diverse as āyurvedaarthaśāstranāṭyaśāstraaṣṭādhyāyī — that had existed before the founding of today’s oldest surviving universities,  until first, the grotesque physical destruction of these places of learning by invading forces and then systematic marginalisation of these systems of knowledge in the mainstream education system, first by colonising forces and then their Indian (ideological) successors. 

This single, launched on May 13, 2019 at the Center for Soft Power, Chennai, was made more vivid by custom choreography by renowned Bharatanātyam performer and CSP Researcher Ms. Pavithra Srinivasan (https://www.pavithrasrinivasan.dance/).

CREDITS

Raag/am: Bairāgi/Revati
Sung by: Shruti and Smruthi Kalyanasundharam
Melody: Megh Kalyanasundaram

LYRICS (Translation by Dr Korada Subrahmanyam)

सरस्वति नमस्तुभ्यं वरदे कामरूपिणि । विद्यारम्भं करिष्यामि सिद्धिर्भवतु मे सदा ॥
O! Sarasvati! you grant boons, you can have your desired form – I offer my namaskara (means: I am inferior to you and you are superior to me) to you. I am going to start my study: let there be success to me always.


श्रुतिस्मृतिपुराणानाम् आलयं करुणालयम् |नमामि भगवत्पादं शङ्करं लोकशङ्करम् ||
I offer namaskara to Bhagavan Sankara, who is an abode of Srutis, Smritis and Puranas, an abode of  kindness and who provides comfort to people (thru Jnanam).


पुराणन्यायमीमांसाधर्मशास्त्राङ्गमिश्रिताः। वेदाः स्थानानि विद्यानां धर्मस्य च चतुर्दश || 
The Four Vedas viz. Rgveda, Yajurveda, Samveda, Atharvaveda, Puranas, Nyaya, Mimamsa, Dharmasastram along  with the six Vedangas, viz Siksha, Vyakaranam, Chandas, Niruktam, Jyotisham, Kalpa: these fourteen are the abodes of Vidya (Jnanam) and Dharma.


आयुर्वेदो धनुर्वेदो गान्धर्व श्चेत्य नुक्रमात् । अर्थशास्त्रं परं तस्मात् विद्याह्यष्टादश स्मृताः || 
Ayurveda, Dhanurveda, Gandharvaveda and Arthasastram, the four Upavedas, coupled with the said fourteen are called eighteen Vidyas.


ॐ शान्तिः शान्तिः शान्तिः ॥
Aum, Peace, Peace, Peace!




For more, see: https://shrutismrti.wixsite.com/ashtaadashavidyaa and https://www.academia.edu/39123151/Soft_power_Indic_Knowledge_Systems

Handspun and Handwoven

“India is the only country today that has skills of hand spinning. It is the most unique resource in the world today” – Mayank Mansingh Kaul

Against the background of the 150th birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi this year – whose call for Khadi led to the Indian freedom movement – Ahalya Matthan of the Registry of Sarees, and designer Mayank Mansingh Kaul – held the third iteration of Meanings and Metaphors in Bangalore. In a free flowing conversation they spoke about handmade textiles, the identities they impart as well as their place in contemporary design.

The sarees displayed at Meanings and Metaphors only hinted at the diversity of textiles that exist in India. A diversity that goes far beyond the textiles themselves.

Ahalya Matthan Director and Founder of the Registry of Sarees, a Research and Study Centre in Bangalore of handspun and handwoven textiles, is trying to create cultural capsules to find commonalities and communicate that using textiles. “I personally feel in India we have nothing in common – not food, not religion, politics, language, geography, music history, etc. And in this diverseness, it is difficult to find common ground except for in our textiles, There is a love for textiles in all of us,” says Ahalya.

Ahalya Matthan is the Director and Founder of the Registry of Sarees, a Research and Study Centre in Bangalore of handspun and handwoven textiles (All Photo Credits: Registry of Sarees)

Take for instance the Bundi saree, which the Registry’s site says is a ‘modern day response to a young nation’s identity’. It merges skill and craft sets from two entirely different regions, Kancheepuram and Rajasthan. The pure cotton saree with the silk borders specially woven using the three-shuttle ‘temple’ technique synonymous with Kancheepuram was combined with the highly skilled block printing technique using blocks developed from inspirations at the Bundi Fort, Rajasthan. They were merged onto the sarees, thereby linking Rajasthan and Tamil Nadu. “A rich colour pallet that is appreciated in both states was used to bring forth a similarity of appreciation and culture,” says the Registry.

The Bundi saree, merges skill and craft sets from two entirely different regions, Kancheepuram and Rajasthan

For Mayank Mansingh Kaul, a textile and fashion designer, and Founder-Director of The Design Project India, the most attractive thing is that India is the only country today that has skills of hand spinning. “It is the most unique resource in the world today. Apart from that, the thing that hits people the most about our textiles when they come from outside is that it is so diverse. It is the quality of cotton, the quality of natural dyeing that does not exist elsewhere in the world. It has such an amazing variety of motifs where everything has a meaning. What draws people from outside and within it is endless, but the first thing is the sheer diversity.” With textiles changing even as one moves from one part of Tamil Nadu to another. 

A lot of this fascination is articulated through the stories from foreigners, friends of Mayank. “The Japanese are more attracted to the material quality. They are very interested in the structure, the materiality. Whereas in the West, people are interested in the stories. Today we think of the Kota Doria as being synonymous with Rajasthan, but it was originally the Mysoria Doria. It goes from the Royal Court of Mysore to Kota. I think these are the stories that are very appealing to the West.”

Mayank has researched these stories and his writings talk about the recent history of Indian textiles. “You have to talk about textiles not just as a product but as a confluence of the political and the social. Khadi was political. In the 60s and 70s when everyone wanted to wear imported chiffon, Indira Gandhi started wearing handloom. She even had rules, we believe, that all government offices had to buy only handloom furnishings –curtains and sofa covers and other things. To make that shift when people wanted to look at western references, was something,” says Mayank.

Mayank Mansingh Kaul is a textile and fashion designer, and Founder-Director of The Design Project India

When Ahalya and Mayank thought about collaborating, they found there was a lot of misinformation about textile history. “Suddenly people were selling Hindru sarees. There was never anything called the Hindru saree. Hindru was a fabric woven for shervanis among the Mughal or aristocratic class,” says Mayank.

A graduate of the National Institute of Design, Mayank says it is only in the last 10-12 years there has been an interest in the study of contemporary Indian textile. “NID is one of the oldest design institutions in the world and until my batch in 2001 we were still taught by some of the founders of the NID. NID was formed with international linkages to movements like the Bauhaus (learning by doing rather than the traditional transmission of traditional knowledge) in Europe. So we knew what happened 200 or 300 years back but we had very little understanding of what happened 100 years back or 60 years or post-Independence. I felt those histories were not in books and exhibitions. So over a period of time, my own practice looked at design, fashion and textiles in the modern period and my argument is that we have not sufficiently understood this period.”

Mayank quotes historical inaccuracies, emphasising the need to learn more about our textiles in contemporary times. For instance, the Telia Rumal of Andhra Pradesh was never the saree which it is today. It was a rumal that was exported to the Arab world. “These are more contemporary histories. Another example is the Ikat sarees which people believe have always been made in Ikat in Andhra Pradesh. Whereas it is a much more recent phenomenon. It is only in the 1950s and 60s that the tradition of the Ikat saree emerged. My interest is to look at the more recent history and fill in the gaps through that between the present and the historical.”

Mayank’s previous major exhibition at the Jawahar Kala Kendra was an exhibition on the history of 70 years of Indian textiles since Independence told through 70 textiles using textiles that were both art and fashion.

“Often, we don’t see the story behind these textiles, it stops with buying and wearing them. My efforts are to do non-commercial curated exhibitions. These collections are not about buying, it’s about being aware of the textile, or enjoying the pleasure of looking at it – it’s an educational process.”

At the first exhibition of Meanings and Metaphors at Chirala in Andhra Pradesh, 5000 weavers attended the event. The exhibitions serve as repository of the best work of weavers. In their research Ahalya and Mayank noticed that weavers often sell the best of what they have made. “If they cannot retain the best examples of what they make, how can their future generations replicate that quality? So when you take an exhibition like this they are reminded of the quality that they have made, but that they have not been able to hold on to. In an environment where textiles and fashion are so over articulated, we try to provide non-commercial platforms to view and understand these traditions,” says Mayank.

At the first exhibition of Meanings and Metaphors at Chirala in Andhra Pradesh, 5000 weavers attended the event

Another collection that will be exhibited by them in 2020 – Sarees of India – will feature sarees from the late 19th century to the 1980s.  Whenever the duo gets access to a collection they store it at the Study and Research Centre at the Registry of Sarees and anyone can access it for research or viewing. The center has over 108 variety of fabrics and 108 sarees of which only 51 have been exhibited.

Mayank and Ahalya see textiles as an inheritance that needs to be cherished. Every saree for them has a story as it passes through atleast twenty hands before becoming what it is. At the time when there was a move to remove reservations and subsidies for the handloom sector, Ahalya became a part of the 100 sarees pact. She and her colleagues decided to become proactive and wear more handloom sarees in order to get people to wear handloom and support weavers.

Speaking about identity and the saree, Ahalya says the Registry has seen a lot of interest from expats who are ‘interested to interact with the drape and even to know about the pieces.’ “Expats in cities like Bangalore, Gurugoan, Bombay, not so much traditional hubs like Delhi and Calcutta are adopting the saree to be able to fit into the cultural environment. It gives them an inroad not just into a new ritual or experience like going to a temple or eating from a plaintain leaf, experiences you have as someone coming to a new country, but it also gives them a sense of bonding and community and that I think is very important,” says Ahalya.

Pamela Kaplan, who headed IBM at Bangalore for two years was an American with red hair, and so was very conspicuous among her staff. Ahalya says she started wearing sarees to work every day. “The norm and trend in IBM was western wear and even formals were gowns – Indo Western gowns. And suddenly, she said, in two to three months the culture of the organisation changed. Young women and men started feeling awkward that she was coming in sarees and they started wearing Indian clothes. It is just conditioning.”

“Indians are not Brand oriented but Product Oriented”                               

Mayank did a project last year on 50 years of Ritu Kumar, the brand and the person. Today, Kumar owns a multi-crore company with over 80 stores in India as well as branches Paris, London and New. Mayank is working on a personal memoir of hers, bringing together her notes made over the years. “Ritu says ‘what Chennai wants is fundamentally different from what Ludhiana wants’.”

Mayank says this is not the same as big luxury brands which have over 500 stores around the world with all their shop windows looking the same, and all the products are the same. “We laugh because these stores have outlets in Delhi and other places and in August they have the woollen collection because in the West, winter starts in August. Here we still have four months of summer left. Ritu was also telling us, it is not just about handloom policy, the diversity is so much that even large companies like these who would love to have a standard format, cannot function optimally here. Sizes are different, body types are different from region to region, cultural buying is different.”

In the West, identities come from brands, because they don’t have close family ties, says Mayank. “In India we have so many identities, we have religious identities, geographical identities, cultural identities, you have an identity from your father’s side, an identity from your mother’s side, where you grew up, then your college, your professional environment. In the West you don’t have these identities. So brands give you identities ‘I only buy Gucci or Aesop or Forest Essentials’. In India we go for the product. Only here, we will buy the blouse from one designer and the saree from another,” says Mayank.

He speaks about his great grandmother who was a child widow, and was sent by her father-in-law, to do a PhD in Cambridge and wore only sarees. “From then onwards if you look at the history of women and clothing, somehow the lure of the saree hasn’t gone. There is something about the saree that provides a kind of identity which is fascinating. Even in Indian fashion, fashion designers are always making new versions of the saree. It’s a dress saree or a Chota saree, or a saree with Churidhars. It is something that has consistently been observed to have given Indian women an identity and there is no other equivalent that has given them the same kind of identity.”

 Modernity versus tradition

Traditionally, the weaver in India was the designer, but in the modern context  city-based designers have become the face of our textiles, putting the weaver lower in the ecosystem.

Mayank has expressed his objections to the designer being perceived as the value addition and the weaving and craft as labour. “That is a western referenced idea. We have to remember that design came up in the West in the Post-World War when they had to use machines. Design came up in an environment where you didn’t have crafts people left. In the Indian context unfortunately we have looked at design from these perspectives where the designer is the intermediary. In the traditional systems, there’s a person who designs, person who cuts the cloth and everybody worked together. I have a problem with the designer being the face because in pictures you will see the hands of the craftsman, and the face of the artist and designer. A lot of my curatorial work challenges that. I always show art, design, textiles, craft together.”

Mayank addressed these concerns in his exhibition ‘Fracture: Indian textiles new Conversations.’ While normally the ideas are those of the designer, with the craftspersons producing them, but here they projected the work as collaborations. “So the name of the craftsperson was mentioned alongside the designer. So curatorially, we could provide them that equality. Unless they have social status, they are producing things that someone else is claiming credit for. I think we need to move into a creative era where anyone who is involved in a creative and manufacturing process has equal credit.”

Earlier people would source the sarees from the weaver directly. “Families that would buy from Benaras would go to the weaver’s family directly. There was that contact. Designers have changed that because we have given them the responsibility of training the weavers, giving them new ideas. It’s a two way thing. Weavers are being informed by designers because they are in a different context, cut off from things.”

However, things have improved for the weavers, says Mayank. In the last 5-10 years many of the master weavers have done well for themselves, so much so that their children have gone to design schools.

“In Andhra we visited two Master weavers, and now they don’t sell their best pieces because now they want to keep a creative museum of their own best works. There’s new found pride and there’s financial success. But some would say that no matter how wealthy you are nobody wants to marry a weaver’s son because of the caste and social status implications. It is a very complex situation but I think the first step is to give them a face and a name.”

“Every state needs its own handloom policy”

The diversity in textiles is so huge that it is not possible to have a single marketing strategy for the whole country, believes Mayank.

What may work in Kutch may not work in Orissa. Kutch has been an entrepreneurial community for the last 1000 years and so their crafts are thriving. “The whole world is in Kutch, from Japan to America. But if you take Orissa or Bengal, they are not entrepreneurial communities traditionally. In Sambalpur in Orissa, all the uniforms in colleges and schools are compulsorily handloom. So State government intervention has helped.”

In Kutch, where the problem is not product development or marketing, or design, the government may have to have a different kind of role.  The Government role has to be sensitive to these individual contexts, adds Mayank.

“The role of the government should be to provide an ecology where workers can work with pride and have working conditions that are human.”

Soft Power: Indic Knowledge Systems, Technology and Management

The Center for Soft Power hosted a discussion on the topic of “Soft Power: Indic Knowledge Systems, Technology and Management.” The discussion was led by Dr. Korada Subrahmanyam, Chairman-Intermediate Board Sanskrit Textbook committee and Professor of Sanskrit, Centre for Applied Linguistics and Translation Studies, University of Hyderabad and Mr. Megh Kalyanasundaram, alumni of Indian School of Business with diverse professional experience spanning management, technology, research, learning platform development and music.

The Center for Soft Power hosted a discussion on the topic of “Soft Power: Indic Knowledge Systems, Technology and Management.”

Dr. Korada began the discussion by explaining in great detail, the various elements of the Ashtaadashavidyaa, which are the 18 forms of Knowledge that was consolidated from the totality of the Vedas. He explained the intricacies of each element, and how it represented a specific form of knowledge that is uniquely Indian, and which can be of great importance to the world going forward.

“What is a Veda? A Veda is a mass of knowledge” – Dr. Korada Subrahmanyam

Mr. Megh Kalyanasundaram, spoke about the need to bring much of this knowledge to the modern world through the use of technology. He spoke of the need to digitise this knowledge and create avenues through which this knowledge can be accessed online. He described his efforts in doing this through two of his projects: श्रीमद्भगवद्गीता | #gita and Srutismriti | Vidyasthanani Caturdasa Astadasa.

“India at one point was leading soft power in the field of education” – Mr. Megh Kalyanasundaram

“Food for me is an emotion and that emotion is Indian”

Bangalore can lay claim on internationally renowned chef Anthony Huang who in his own words is a ‘thoroughbred Bangalorean’. His parents moved to Bangalore when he was one year old and he has grown up, studied and worked here, heading the kitchens of some of the top brands in the city including The Sheraton Grand, JW Marriott, Hyatt and The Oberoi. In this interview he speaks about his influences and his passion for Indian cuisine and culture

His parents moved to Bangalore when he was one year old and he has grown up, studied and worked here, heading the kitchens of some of the top brands in the city including The Sheraton Grand, JW Marriott, Hyatt and The Oberoi

Growing up in Bangalore and become a chef here, did you feel it was big enough for someone with your talent?

Anthony Huang: Bangalore has always been exceptionally kind to me. My first exposure to hotels was in Bangalore at a time where everyone called Bangalore a Tier II city and that I needed to move out of the city to really learn. My career took me in and out of the city and I came back to head some of the most prestigious kitchens. Guests in Bangalore are well travelled, unassuming (and in many cases as knowledgeable as you are). This obviously keeps you on your toes all the time, constantly innovating and making sure you are relevant.

You have made a name for your signature dishes with coffee. Did that idea take root here?

Anthony Huang: Having grown up in Bangalore, coffee is something that I take very personally and whose flavours I understand reasonably well. I am a huge crusader of trying to use locally available produce as far as possible and try and do my bit for the environment. There is no doubt in my mind that locally sourced raw materials are always the best option.

 This along with a desire to do something different and an opportunity to keep escaping from hotel life into a plantation got me started.

“I am a huge crusader of trying to use locally available produce as far as possible and try and do my bit for the environment. There is no doubt in my mind that locally sourced raw materials are always the best option. “

How was it working with Oberoi, Hyatt, Marriott and now Elior? How would you describe each of these experiences? How are they different?

Anthony Huang: Well my experiences with Hotels as a Chef gave me a lot of exposure, taught me new things and gave me the platform to try different things all the time.

Elior now gives me the platform to do similar things but on a much larger scale. I wanted to take a little break from hotels and try out something different. This job gave me the opportunity to set up a new facility, handle huge volumes and I am gaining from it personally in the form of learning something I have never done before.

You have mentioned in earlier interviews that you missed a lot of classes while at college. What is the role of Hotel Management schools in producing international standard chefs in India? Is work experience of more value?

Anthony Huang: Hotel Schools have progressed a lot ever since I have passed out of college. They are today supported by easier access to data, information and infrastructure. There were many things that we heard for the first time like Pasta and cheese. Today’s kids enter college having already tried at least 15 varieties of each, so they start of at a much higher platform so to speak. I have visited my Alma Mater “Christ College” and I must say that I am pleasantly surprised to see the progress that they have made and the quality of students they produce.

Work experience and academic qualification go hand in hand for me. There are just so many things for a professional to learn besides just learning how to hold a pan and cook a few dishes.

Anthony Huang with His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama

You have cooked Chinese, Vietnamese and French food…. and also Indian. What is it about Indian food that appeals to you?

Anthony Huang: Well I am an Indian at heart and an Indian in my head. I have grown up eating some of the best Indian food in my friends’ houses and have always wanted to learn how to cook it myself at home. The memories of Indian food is something that reminds me of my growing years, of my friendships and bonds that I will cherish forever.

Food for me is an emotion and that emotion is Indian. The day I don’t feel it I just don’t enter the kitchen. Only happy chefs can make food that talks to you.

How does one create a clientele who will come back again and again for food in a luxury hotel?

Anthony Huang: Clientele in a luxury hotel looks for that one extra touch of luxury in a plate that a free standing restaurant cannot provide him. Today the gap has become narrower but still has some catching up to do. It could be simply sourcing the best and responsibly grown lettuce or getting your desserts made with the best chocolate. Everyone’s perception of luxury is not the same, the key lies in identifying that perception.

“Sometimes it really makes me feel that these street vendors are the True keepers of our culture. We were completely blown away by the fact that she refused to take a penny for the vegetables that Chef Kuan picked up because she considered him as a guest to her country. I’m sure that these are the memories that he is going to take back!! So proud of her.”

What about your family. Do they like Indian food?

Anthony Huang: My family loves Indian food as much as I do. In fact my 15 year old daughter’s favourite food is “Ragi Mudde”. That says a lot I guess.

How much of food is authentic to cultures. We have ‘Gobi Manchurian’ being more famous than any other Chinese dish, but it is not authentic Chinese food. What are your thoughts on this?

 My thoughts are very simple. Some intelligent guy was able to identify what the masses wanted and made sure everyone went home rubbing his tummy. What’s the harm? I believe that a Chefs primary job is to keep the people he is cooking for happy.